PPL Pine Poles
$48/ton
PST Pine Sawtimber
$23/ton
CNS Chip-n-Saw
$17/ton
PPW Pine Pulpwood
$9/ton
PLY Ply Logs
$28/ton
MXH Mixed Sawtimber
$36/ton
OAK Oak Sawtimber
$49/ton
HPW Hardwood Pulpwood
$13/ton

Product Descriptions

Hardwood Sawtimber

Hardwood sawtimber is made up of grade logs from red oak, white oak, ash and generally poplar. Other species are generally merchandised as crossties or palletwood. This is from a quality tree with at least one log length with clear wood (no knots, disease, forks, or other deformities from mature trees). It is used mostly for furniture or plywood.

Hardwood Pulpwood

Pulpwood can be pine or hardwood. Many people talk about the pulpwood on their land as strictly the smaller diameter trees that are not big enough or mature enough to make a solid, higher value wood product. Pulpwood is anything carried to the mill that is chipped, boiled, and then converted to pulp and run through screens to produce varying qualities of paper products. High value sawtimber trees could be taken in as pulpwood, but the landowner loses considerable value by this occurrence. However, larger diameter trees that have big limbs low down the tree’s trunk near the ground will disqualify this tree for sawtimber and it has to go as pulpwood. So, deformed, diseased, crooked, limbed trees with large diameters will be loaded on a truck with other trees destined for the pulp mill.

Also, doty hardwood (trees with rotted, decayed or hollow heart from the ground upward) will also disqualify what would have been a hardwood log from going to the sawmill. These doty trees may not be noticeable as being hollow until they are cut down, creating a real problem for a buyer purchasing the trees thinking they are going to be $30/ton trees when they end up being $8/ton trees, a big potential loss. Old-growth Pine trees can have heart-rot that causes the same decay within the middle of pine trees, ruining their usage for sawtimber. Pulpwood is the lowest value timber product coming from the forest.

There is however, when the market is advantageous, which it is not for now, a fuelwood product that is lower priced than pulpwood. When the mills are taking this product, a chipper will come to the woods, following the logging process, and chip all the remaining scrap tops, limps, and butt-cuts that were left on the property. There is little to most likely no value to the landowner for this product, but it does clear the land of the debris, which is actually a huge savings to the landowner that would have otherwise cost a considerable amount of money to clear. Pulpwood hauled to the mill in tree length requires a 3” top at 24 feet length.

There is sometimes a topwood product that is actually pulpwood. It is the leftover top portion of a sawtimber tree where a log or multiple logs were cut from the base of the sawtimber tree and then the balance of the tree is loaded on a truck going to a pulp mill. The tops are generally smaller in diameter and lower in weight than a normal load of pulpwood. They also take more effort to generate a load and the weight of the load is lower than a full tree length load of pulpwood. Therefore, it naturally commands a lower value than normal treelength pulpwood.

Pine Sawtimber

Super pulpwood, chip-n-saw, pine sawtimber and plylogs are pine products. Super pulpwood and chip-n-saw are just small sawtimber products. Pine sawtimber plywood utilizes the larger, straighter pines with few limbs from which they cut dimensional lumber. These are usually older trees with tight growth rings, indicating slower growth and a more dense wood, for a better quality sawn lumber. Sawtimber requires an 9” top at 33’ length minimum.

Chip-n-saw requires a 6.5” to 7” top at 33’. And Super Pulpwood requires a 5 to 6” top at 29’. Plylogs are good quality logs, usually cut to length starting at 16’ and then 8’ additional increments. Plylogs are cut to 4’ lengths at the mill and then veneer is peeled from the log like pulling thread from a spool, except at a very high speed. These sheets of veneer are glued together to create plywood that is cut to 4’ x 8’ sheets. Until recent years, super pulpwood was hauled to the mill as pulpwood.

Pine Pulpwood

Pulpwood can be pine or hardwood. Many people talk about the pulpwood on their land as strictly the smaller diameter trees that are not big enough or mature enough to make a solid, higher value wood product. Pulpwood is anything carried to the mill that is chipped, boiled, and then converted to pulp and run through screens to produce varying qualities of paper products. High value sawtimber trees could be taken in as pulpwood, but the landowner loses considerable value by this occurrence. However, larger diameter trees that have big limbs low down the tree’s trunk near the ground will disqualify this tree for sawtimber and it has to go as pulpwood.

So, deformed, diseased, crooked, limbed trees with large diameters will be loaded on a truck with other trees destined for the pulp mill. Also, doty hardwood (trees with rotted, decayed or hollow heart from the ground upward) will also disqualify what would have been a hardwood log from going to the sawmill. These doty trees may not be noticeable as being hollow until they are cut down, creating a real problem for a buyer purchasing the trees thinking they are going to be $30/ton trees when they end up being $8/ton trees, a big potential loss. Old-growth Pine trees can have heart-rot that causes the same decay within the middle of pine trees, ruining their usage for sawtimber. Pulpwood is the lowest value timber product coming from the forest.

There is however, when the market is advantageous, which it is not for now, a fuelwood product that is lower priced than pulpwood. When the mills are taking this product, a chipper will come to the woods, following the logging process, and chip all the remaining scrap tops, limps, and butt-cuts that were left on the property. There is little to most likely no value to the landowner for this product, but it does clear the land of the debris, which is actually a huge savings to the landowner that would have otherwise cost a considerable amount of money to clear. Pulpwood hauled to the mill in tree length requires a 3” top at 24 feet length.

There is sometimes a topwood product that is actually pulpwood. It is the leftover top portion of a sawtimber tree where a log or multiple logs were cut from the base of the sawtimber tree and then the balance of the tree is loaded on a truck going to a pulp mill. The tops are generally smaller in diameter and lower in weight than a normal load of pulpwood. They also take more effort to generate a load and the weight of the load is lower than a full tree length load of pulpwood. Therefore, it naturally commands a lower value than normal treelength pulpwood.

FAQs

Why Do Timber Prices Vary By Region?

Timber prices are directly affected by the forces of supply and demand. If mills need wood, prices go up. If mills don’t need wood, prices go down. However, there are several other factors that influence the price of timber by region:

Mills – Mills are the foundation of established timber markets, because they determine what products can be bought and sold. Mills specialize in processing certain types of wood and determine the price they’re willing to pay. If a landowner only has access to one mill in the area and that mill only produces one type of product, there won’t be very many options in creating competition.

Distance – Wood has to be delivered to a mill before it’s processed. The distance your timber has to travel before it reaches the mill is taken into account by timber companies when bidding for your timber. The distance to and from the mill is directly proportional to a timber companies overhead. The further they have to travel, the more gas they will use and the higher their costs will be.

Products – Some geographical areas are known for specific products that may not grow well elsewhere. In turn, some areas will have higher prices than others, because markets exist as a result of their products. If a mill can only get the product it needs in Region A, you can bet they’re not going to build a mill or buy wood in Region B.

Competition – Ultimately, timber markets are driven by competition. When there’s more competition over wood due to any number of factors, the price goes up. When there’s less competition, because of any number of factors, the price goes down.

Why Do Timber Prices Vary From State to State?

States are very similar to regions, because the market effect on timber prices is universal. The same factors that determine regional prices, also influence markets in different states. The geography, measuring system and products may be completely different, but the market operates in a similar way. For specifics, check out the previous FAQ about price by region.

Why Timber Update?

Timber Update exists to give landowners access to timber companies that compete for your business. You can fill out a form and get connected or you can search our timber company database and connect with a timber company yourself. When timber companies compete, you win!

What’s The Easiest Way To Get Help?

At the bottom of this page there is a Get Connected section. Choose the service you’re looking for and complete the form and you will be connected with leading timber companies in your area.

What Are My Trees Worth?

Ultimately, your trees are worth what someone is willing to pay and also depend on market conditions. Timber Update helps landowners by connected them with local timber pros, education and by updating landowners on market conditions.

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